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Tax Alerts

By the time most Canadians sit down to organize their various tax slips and receipts and undertake to complete their tax return for 2015, the most significant opportunities to minimize the tax bill for the year are no longer available. Most such tax planning or saving strategies, in order to be effective for 2015, must have been implemented by the end of the calendar year. The major exception to that is, of course, the making of registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) contributions, but even that had to be done on or before February 29, 2016 in order to be deducted on the return for 2015.


Over the next academic and calendar year, post-secondary students will find that a number of changes are taking place with respect to the rules governing the financing side of post-secondary education. Some of those changes will be welcome, and others will not.


For even the most determined of procrastinators, the deadline for filing an individual income tax return for the 2015 tax year is imminent. That deadline will come on Monday May 2, 2016 for most Canadians, and on Wednesday June 15, 2016 for the self-employed and their spouses.


For several decades, Canadian families have received financial assistance from the federal government to help offset the cost of raising children, through a range of benefits and allowance programs. Those programs have taken a variety of forms, from direct payments to parents to credits provided on the annual tax return. Some amounts provided under some such programs were taxable, while others were not. The one constant throughout those decades is that such programs are in a continual state of change and revision, resulting in a sometimes confusing patchwork of entitlements.


Two quarterly newsletters have been added—one dealing with personal issues, and one dealing with corporate issues.


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