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Canada’s tax system is a self-assessing and self-reporting one, in which taxpayers are expected (and required) to provide the tax authorities with an annual summary of their income and any deductions and tax credits claimable, along with payment of any tax amount owed. Although no one really likes doing their taxes, or paying those taxes, the vast majority of Canadians nonetheless do file their returns on time, and pay up. For a significant minority, however, completing and filing the return is something that just doesn’t get done. Sometimes the cause is just procrastination, while in other cases, a taxpayer is worried that there will be a large balance owing and he or she avoids completing and filing the return for that reason.


Springtime and early summer is moving season in Canada. The real estate market is traditionally at its strongest in the spring, and spring house sales are followed by real estate closings and moves in the following late spring and early summer months. All of this means that a great number of Canadians will be buying or selling houses this spring and summer and, inevitably, moving. Moving is a stressful and often expensive undertaking, even when the move is a desired one — buying a coveted (and increasingly difficult to obtain) first home, perhaps, or taking a step up the property ladder to a second, larger home. There is not much that can diminish the stress of moving, but the financial hit can be offset somewhat by a tax deduction which may be claimed for many of those moving-related costs.


By now, most Canadian taxpayers (excepting the self-employed and their spouses, who have until June 15) will have filed their 2015 income tax returns. Once the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has processed those millions of returns, over the next few weeks and months, taxpayers across Canada will begin to receive Notices of Assessment for 2015. In most cases, the Notice of Assessment issued will simply confirm the information which the taxpayer provided on the return, perhaps with some minor arithmetical corrections. However, not infrequently, the Notice of Assessment will indicate that the CRA has disallowed or changed the amount of certain deductions or credits, or has included in income amounts not declared by the taxpayer on his or her return. When that happens, it’s time for the taxpayer to decide whether to dispute the CRA’s assessment of their tax situation.


In recent years, there has been a great deal of public discussion about the availability (and the viability) of federal income support programs for retirees. It’s not news that Canada’s population is aging, and the demands placed on government-sponsored retirement income programs will of course increase as greater numbers of Canadians reach the age at which they will be entitled to receive monthly benefit payments from those programs.


Two quarterly newsletters have been added—one dealing with personal issues, and one dealing with corporate issues.


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