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The early months of the new calendar year can feel like a never-ending series of bills and other financial obligations. Credit card bills from holiday spending, or perhaps a mid-winter vacation, are due or coming due. The RRSP deadline of February 29, 2016 is approaching, and the May 2, 2016 deadline for payment of any final balance of 2015 income taxes owed is not far behind.


Millions of Canadians receive Old Age Security (OAS) benefits, meaning that millions of Canadians may be subject to the OAS “recovery tax” or, as it is more commonly referred to, the clawback. Unfortunately, very few Canadians are familiar with that tax or how it works, and even fewer incorporate the possibility of having to pay the tax into their retirement income planning. There are, however, strategies which allow taxpayers to minimize or avoid the OAS clawback in retirement.


Canadian taxpayers don’t need a calendar to know that the registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) contribution deadline is approaching — the glut of television, radio and internet ads which fill the airwaves and screens this time of year are reminder enough. And, while RRSP planning and retirement planning generally are best approached as an ongoing, year-round activity, it is true that an imminent deadline tends to focus the minds of taxpayers on such issues


As the time for the traditionally strong spring housing market approaches, the current state of Canadian real estate is on the minds of a lot of Canadians these days. It’s also a concern for Finance Canada, which has made a change to Canadian mortgage financing rules which will take effect on February 15, 2016, in time for that spring housing market.


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